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Setra Blog

October 20, 2016

What is Absolute Pressure?

Absolute pressure is measured relative to a full vacuum (0 PSIA = 14.7 PSIV).  The electrical output of an absolute pressure transducer is 0 VDC at 0 PSIA and full scale output (typically 5 VDC) at full scale pressure (in PSIA).  PSIA (pounds per square inch absolute) is a unit of pressure measured relative to a full vacuum.  A vacuum can refer to any pressure between 0 PSIA and 14.7 PSIA.

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October 17, 2016

4 Considerations For Low Pressure Measurements

Low pressure measurements are required in various applications such as air flow, static duct and cleanroom pressures in HVAC and energy management systems (EMS).  Other applications include use in medical instrumentation, environmental pollution control, boil combustion efficiency and a wide variety of research and development requirements.  Although the focus will center mainly on air flow and pressure, the same principles

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February 22, 2016

Selecting the Right High Temperature Industrial Pressure Transducer for Liquids or Gases

When selecting an industrial pressure transducer for monitoring high temperature liquids or gases be sure to check the operating temperature range of the transducer, in order to select the correct pressure transducer for these applications.

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November 05, 2015

How To Select an Intrinsically Safe Pressure Transducer

There are 5 things you should know when selecting intrinsically safe pressure transducers there are a number of things to look for.

1. Be assured that the pressure transducer has been significantly modified for intrinsically safe applications — the printed circuit board has been simplified to use low voltage and current, capacitors and inductors have been minimized, etc. Intrinsically safe

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November 02, 2015

Pressure Transducers for High Temperature Liquids & Gases

One factor that should be considered when selecting an industrial pressure transducer for monitoring high temperature liquids or gases is the operating temperature range of the transducer. This specification is included under environmental data on most manufacturers' data sheets. 

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October 29, 2015

6 Things OEM Design Engineers Need to Know

Any design engineer must seriously consider the manufacturing environment when looking to select a pressure transducer for inclusion within a refrigeration chiller, pump, engine test equipment, or other machinery. The life of a pressure transducer is proportional to the system design and assembly process. 

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October 19, 2015

How to Troubleshoot 2 & 3 Wire Circuits

The following steps clearly indicate the exact sequence to properly troubleshoot a Setra 2 wire, mil-amp circuit. You must work with the assumption that either the Setra product or the system & circuitry is bad.

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October 15, 2015

Accuracy: End Point Method vs. Best Fit Straight Line Method

Which method provides better accuracy?  Non-linearity as the End Point Method is the relationship of the calibration curve to a specified straight line through its endpoints (i.e. Zero and Full Scale). Best Fit Straight Line (BFSL) method is the relationship of the calibration curve to a calculated straight line that minimizes the error but does not pass through the end points. BFSL method effectively cuts the end point value in half.

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September 21, 2015

6 Ways to Prevent Pressure Transducer Failure

If pressure transducers are exposed to a manufacturing environment that exceeds the suppliers specified limits, sensor issues will occur. during storage or assembly. An original equipment manufacturer (OEM) design engineer should take note of the following six conditions while designing a system to be manufactured and shipped to an end-user.

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August 13, 2015

How to Determine the Best pressure Sensor For Tank Level Applications

A common concern surrounding tank level measurement is selecting the right type of sensor technology. Selecting the proper sensor technology will ultimately be determined by the conditions within the tank. The first thing you need to determine is if your vented tank is above ground or buried in-ground. An above ground tank will typically have a process connection external near the bottom of the tank, providing easy access to the sensor. A tank that sits in-ground will typically have an access hatch, where you can install your tank level sensor. Hydrostatic (gauge), capacitance, resistive and ultrasonic sensors are most commonly used for more critical tank level applications. Although they all measure liquid level, they work in different ways.

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